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Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Cancer-fighting virus shown to target tumors alone | Reuters

Cancer-fighting virus shown to target tumors alone | Reuters
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Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python - Learn how to program with a free ebook programming tutorial

Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python - Learn how to program with a free ebook programming tutorial
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Python Tutorials for Kids 8+

Python Tutorials for Kids 8+
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UCLA Researchers Replace Lenses With Holograms to Develop Affordable Handheld Dual-Mode Microscope

UCLA Researchers Replace Lenses With Holograms to Develop Affordable Handheld Dual-Mode Microscope
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Sunday, August 28, 2011

Joint

Joint

Seems to be about social media.
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Movements.org

Movements.org
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Wednesday, August 24, 2011

http://kitty.9bis.com

http://kitty.9bis.com
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Fwd: MEMS Express from MNX



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: MEMS News <mems-news-owner@mems-exchange.org>
Date: Mon, Aug 22, 2011 at 4:45 PM
Subject: MEMS Express from MNX
To: mems-news@mems-exchange.org


View Mailing Online

MEMS technology

thumbnailDeeper Patterns and Easier Process Comes with New Etching Technique
Now researchers at Argonne Center for Nanoscale Materials and Energy Systems Division have published two studies on a technique they have developed called sequential infiltration synthesis (SIS), which builds on long-standing lithography techniques but ...
2011-08-19 IEEE Spectrum - MEMS technology
thumbnailUltra-low-power readout architecture for MEMS/NEMS sensors
(Nanowerk News) Imec and Holst Centre report an ultralow-power readout ASIC for capacitive MEMS/NEMS-based sensors. The system can read both accelerometers and strain sensors in a half-bridge configuration. The gain is controlled by integrating pulses ...
today Nanowerk LLC - MEMS technology
thumbnailElectrodeposition moving to ever smaller dimensions
... interconnects between the chips in a vertical 3D stack. These have dimensions in the range of microns (diameters of 2–10µm and depths of 50–100 µm). For damascene-type structures, Cu interconnects are formed as contacts between various CMOS layers. ...
today Nanowerk LLC - MEMS technology

MEMS business

Rudolph Technologies, Inc. to Participate in the Morgan Stanley 2011 ...
Rudolph provides a full-fab solution through its families of proprietary products that provide critical yield-enhancing information, enabling microelectronic device manufacturers to drive down the costs and time to market of their products. ...
today MarketWatch (press release) - MEMS business
STMicroelectronics to Demonstrate MEMS Innovations at MICROTech World 2011
By Cameron Chai A supplier of MEMS devices for portable and consumer applications, STMicroelectronics will be demonstrating its newest advancements in MEMS for portable and consumer, healthcare, and automotive applications from August 24 to 26 at ...
2011-08-20 AZoNano.com - MEMS business
thumbnailSamsung samples 30nm, 32GB DDR3 RDIMMs
The new 32GB RDIMM with 3D TSV package technology is based on Samsung's 30nm-class four gigabit (Gb) DDR3. It can transmit at speeds of up to 1333 megabits per second (Mbps), a 70 percent gain over preceding quad-rank 32GB RDIMMs with operational ...
2011-08-19 EE Times - MEMS business
thumbnailLeica and Visiopharm Create Integrated Digital Pathology Solution
Leica Microsystems, world-leading providers of Total Digital Pathology solutions, and Visiopharm the leading provider of Histoinformatics Solutions for Life-Sciences, today announce the completed integration of Leica's SlidePath Digital Image Hub with ...
yesterday AZoOptics.com (press release) - MEMS business

Nanotechnology

Microscope Can See in Nano-Detail Using Algorithm Like Hubble Telescope's
By Leigh Page | August 22, 2011 A new microscope can see details at the nanoscale by combining X-rays and an algorithm similar to one used to sharpen images from the Hubble Space Telescope, according to a UC San Diego news release. ...
today Becker's ASC Review - Nanotechnology
thumbnailEtch-a-sketch with superconductors
(Nanowerk News) Reporting in Nature Materials this week ("Evolution and control of oxygen order in a cuprate superconductor"), researchers from the London Centre for Nanotechnology and the Physics Department of Sapienza University of Rome have ...
today Nanowerk LLC - Nanotechnology
Can Nanotechnology Improve Lithium-ion Batteries to Make a Difference for ...
Just so it's clear, I am all in favor of EVs and for having them replace vehicles powered by internal combustion engines, but it just is not clear that Li-ion batteries with incremental improvements brought on by nanotechnology will be the power source ...
today IEEE Spectrum - Nanotechnology
Seeing the world of nanotechnology from a single-molecule perspective
This is the reason for the widespread scientific interest in nanotechnology over the past ten years, and the origin of the expectations for a nanotechnology revolution. "These expectations, however, are now on the point of fading because the findings ...
2011-08-19 R & D Magazine - Nanotechnology
thumbnailSummer students present first results on 'nanoscale origami'
These internships coincide with the announcement of a scientific story on nanoscale origami that has resulted from the internship of the first JHU visiting student in the summer of 2009 with a follow-on program last year. In this work, an approach is ...
today Nanowerk LLC - Nanotechnology
thumbnailNew Methods in Tiny Technology
Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in Cambridge, have recently devised a new method of creating nanoscale structures, which they say is cheap enough to be scaled up for practical applications. This technology is anticipated ...
today The Future of Things - Nanotechnology
Current density protocol compares biosensor performance
Their protocol takes into account both the active area available for transduction following deposition of the nanomaterial and the sensitivity of the device. The current density is defined as K = i/A, where K is the current density, ...
today nanotechweb.org - Nanotechnology

Nanotech business

thumbnailMail Bombings Target Nanotechnologists
The targets, The Chronicle reports, are nanotechnology experts. This month, two professors at the Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education were injured when a package exploded in their office. Experts have compared the group claiming ...
yesterday Village Voice (blog) - Nanotech business
thumbnail'Green nanotechnology' vision is now a roadmap for development
That roadmap has grown up and is now in front of chemistry leaders worldwide with the publication of "Green Nanotechnology Challenges and Opportunities." The new "white paper" on the potential of incorporating benign chemistry practices was co-written ...
today Nanowerk LLC - Nanotech business

Featured Event

SPIE Photonics West 2012
Hear the latest MEMs research at the MOEMS-MEMS symposium at SPIE Photonics West. With over 19,000 attendees Photonics West is the largest photonics and laser event in North America. Plan to attend the event, 21 - 26 January 2012 at The Moscone Center in San Francisco, California, and hear cutting-edge conferences, experience industry-leading courses, and see over 1,150 companies at the exhibition.

Event Calendar

New Prototyping Technologies Reduce Time to Market
2011-08-25
Webinar - 11:30 AM ET, 8:30 AM PT
New Prototyping Technologies Reduce Time to Market
COMS 2011
2011-08-28 - 2011-08-31
Greensboro NC
Commercialization of Micro - Nano Systems
Visit MNX at this event.
COMS 2011
MicroTAS 2011
2011-10-02 - 2011-10-06
Seattle, Washington
The 15th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences
MicroTAS 2011
SENSORS Tech Forum '11 Boston
2011-10-10 - 2011-10-12
Boston, MA
NASA Tech Briefs Presents SENSORS Tech Forum
SENSORS Tech Forum '11 Boston
MEMS in Motion Collaboration Summit
2011-10-12 - 2011-10-13
Palm Springs, CA
It's not who you know today. It's who you're going to need to know tomorrow.
MEMS in Motion Collaboration Summit
MEMS Testing and Reliability Conference
2011-10-20
San Jose CA
Increase yields, decrease waste and increase profitability for your company
MEMS Testing and Reliability Conference
MEMS Executive Congress 2011
2011-11-02 - 2011-11-03
Monterey, CA
Connecting the MEMS supply chain with MEMS end-users
Visit MNX at this event.
MEMS Executive Congress 2011
American Manufacturing Strategies Summit 2011
2011-11-07 - 2011-11-08
Chicago IL
Network with 150 + senior level manufacturing professionals from many disciplines.
 American Manufacturing Strategies Summit 2011
SPIE Photonics West 2012
2012-01-21 - 2012-01-26
San Francisco CA
The world's leading photonics, laser, and biomedical optics conference
SPIE Photonics West 2012
IEEE MEMS 2012
2012-01-29 - 2012-02-02
Paris, France
Focus on Strategies for Reducing Time and Cost of MEMS Testing
IEEE MEMS 2012
MEMS Executive Congress 2012
2012-03-20
Zurich, Switzerland
MEMS Industry Group event co-located with Smart Systems Integration
MEMS Executive Congress 2012
Hilton Head Workshop 2012
2012-06-03 - 2012-06-07
Hilton Head Island, SC
A Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems Workshop
Hilton Head Workshop 2012

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Monday, August 22, 2011

Learn to code | Codecademy

Learn to code | Codecademy
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Fwd: [P2P-F] Fwd: GNU Free Call: An Open Source Skype Alternative



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Dante-Gabryell Monson <dante.monson@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, Aug 22, 2011 at 7:11 AM
Subject: [P2P-F] Fwd: GNU Free Call: An Open Source Skype Alternative
To: econowmix@googlegroups.com, p2p-foundation <p2p-foundation@lists.ourproject.org>


http://www.gnu.org/software/sipwitch/

"GNU SIP Witch can be used to build secure and intercept-free telephone systems that can operate over the public Internet."

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: S
Date: Mon, Aug 22, 2011 at 1:58 AM
Subject: GNU Free Call: An Open Source Skype Alternative
To:


http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/222556/gnu_free_call_an_open_source_skype_alternative.html

The SIP Protocol

To make all that possible, GNU Free Call will use the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP), an Application Layer signaling protocol that's designed to be independent of the underlying transport layer.

Specifically, it will build upon the existing GNU SIP Witch VoIP server, which operates without introducing a central point through which communications can be intercepted or captured. GNU SIP Witch also requires minimal system resources, making it suitable even for low-end embedded routers.

GNU SIP Witch is already packaged in a number of popular Linux distributions, including Ubuntu and Fedora, but it can also be built on most BSD systems from source, and it supports compilation on Microsoft Windows as well, according to the GNU Free Call project.

"We will extend SIP Witch to become aware of peer nodes by supporting host caches, and then support publishing of routes to connected peers," the project explains. Host caches are a mechanism used in older P2P networks and are easy to implement, it adds.




_______________________________________________
P2P Foundation - Mailing list
http://www.p2pfoundation.net
https://lists.ourproject.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/p2p-foundation




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Synthetic Biology Open Language

http://www.sbolstandard.org/docs/turtle-rdf-primer-for-sbol

Turtle is a text RDF representation, it’s based on N3. This form of RDF is easier for people to read and write than RDF/XML. This primer provides a guide as to how to write SBOL as RDF in Turtle syntax.
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Fwd: Citizen science - Microbiology of the Built Environment



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Patrik <patrikd@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, Aug 22, 2011 at 12:43 AM
Subject: Citizen science - Microbiology of the Built Environment
To: DIYbio <diybio@googlegroups.com>


Jonathan Eisen at UC Davis is heading a new project called the
"Microbiology of the Built Environment Network". Jonathan is a big
proponent of Open Access and citizen science, and he has been posting
some ideas for projects that would lend themselves very well to a
DIYBio approach, including sampling microbes from water heaters,
aquariums, etc. Check 'em out:

http://www.microbe.net/2011/04/09/thermophiles-lurking-in-your-basement/

http://www.microbe.net/2011/08/18/more-on-citizen-microbiology-project-from-penn_state-nasa-on-thermophiles-in-water-heaters-via-scicheer-sci4cits/

http://www.microbe.net/2011/08/20/what-microbes-are-lurking-in-your-fish-tank-good-candidate-for-some-citizen-microbiology-i-think/

I'm trying to play matchmaker between Jonathan and our new BioCurious
lab in the Bay Area - it'd be great to do something together.

(for the water heater project, see also:
http://scienceforcitizens.net/blog/2011/08/whats-in-your-water-heater-nasa-wants-to-know/
http://www.scienceforcitizens.net/project/462/ )

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Share the thermophiles lurking in your basement

Share the thermophiles lurking in your basement
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The Known Universe takes viewers from the Himalayas through our atmosphere and the inky black of space to the afterglow of the Big Bang.

http://k21st.wordpress.com/2011/08/21/the-known-universe-by-amnh/
The Known Universe takes viewers from the Himalayas through our atmosphere and the inky black of space to the afterglow of the Big Bang. Every star, planet, and quasar seen in the film is possible because of the world’s most complete four-dimensional map of the universe, the Digital Universe Atlas that is maintained and updated by astrophysicists at the American Museum of Natural History. The new film, created by the Museum, is part of an exhibition, Visions of the Cosmos: From the Milky Ocean to an Evolving Universe, at the Rubin Museum of Art in Manhattan through May 2010.
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Packmol creates an initial point for molecular dynamics simulations by packing molecules in defined regions of space. The packing guarantees that short range repulsive interactions do not disrupt the simulations.

http://www.ime.unicamp.br/~martinez/packmol/


Packmol creates an initial point for molecular dynamics simulations by packing molecules in defined regions of space. The packing guarantees that short range repulsive interactions do not disrupt the simulations.

The great variety of types of spatial constraints that can be attributed to the molecules, or atoms within the molecules, makes it easy to create ordered systems, such as lamellar, spherical or tubular lipid layers.

The user must provide only the coordinates of one molecule of each type, the number of molecules of each type and the spatial constraints that each type of molecule must satisfy.

The package is compatible with input files of PDB, TINKER, XYZ and MOLDY formats.
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Sunday, August 21, 2011

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Saturday, August 20, 2011

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights
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Researchers take lead from dogs to develop cancer detecting electronic nose

Researchers take lead from dogs to develop cancer detecting electronic nose
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Study shows dogs can sniff out lung cancer

Study shows dogs can sniff out lung cancer
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Space Adventures

Space Adventures
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Kyiv Post. Independence. Community. Trust - Lifestyle - News - Energia holding initial negotiations on tourist trip around moon

Kyiv Post. Independence. Community. Trust - Lifestyle - News - Energia holding initial negotiations on tourist trip around moon
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Kit to build Xprotolab | Electronic Kits & Modules | Gabotronics

Kit to build Xprotolab | Electronic Kits & Modules | Gabotronics
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13-Year-Old Makes Solar Power Breakthrough by Harnessing the Fibonacci Sequence | Inhabitat - Green Design Will Save the World

13-Year-Old Makes Solar Power Breakthrough by Harnessing the Fibonacci Sequence | Inhabitat - Green Design Will Save the World
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Fwd: Wired: Genome at Home: Biohackers Build Their Own Labs



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Bryan Bishop <kanzure@gmail.com>
Date: Fri, Aug 19, 2011 at 5:54 PM
Subject: Wired: Genome at Home: Biohackers Build Their Own Labs
To: diybio <diybio@googlegroups.com>, Bryan Bishop <kanzure@gmail.com>



http://www.wired.com/magazine/2011/08/mf_diylab/

A tiny spare bedroom is not an ideal space for a high tech biofabrication facility. To get to the one Josh Perfetto is putting together, visitors must walk all the way to the back of his mostly unfurnished house in Saratoga, California—through the kitchen, past some empty rooms, across a den with a lone couch—then climb a poorly lit staircase and round a corner. The room itself is about 120 square feet and has one big window with a view of an adjacent roof. There's an 8-foot-wide gap in the middle; the rest of the room is for science. "I thought about moving the lab to the empty living room downstairs," Perfetto says. "I really need more space. But that's right by the front door. I don't want to freak people out."

He laughs a little awkwardly, and it's easy to see why he's worried. With its Pyrex containers on metal racks and other clinical-looking equipment, the bedroom looks perfect for cooking crystal meth. A mass of wires spills out of a wooden box; on top sits a metal plate punched full of holes. A table holds several laptops, test tubes, a box of purple surgical gloves, a rack with pipettes in various sizes, rubber tubes connected to vials, an orange plastic box with a blue light in the bottom, and a centrifuge that looks like an oversize rice cooker. The wooden box is actually a homemade device for doing polymerase chain reactions (PCR), a process that turns small samples of DNA into quantities large enough to analyze. And the orange plastic thing runs gel electrophoresis, a way to sort DNA strands by size. Perfetto, an engineer, built a few of the gadgets himself.

"I've been sleeping in here," says Mackenzie Cowell, Perfetto's business partner. "And who knows what kinds of chemicals have soaked into this rug!" He flew out to California from Boston a week earlier and has been working with Perfetto on a DIY genomics kit to sell through their new business, CoFactor. The problem is, right now extracting and amplifying DNA at home still takes too many steps. The guys are worried that people won't enjoy the process if it's too complicated.

And the home audience is their target market. Cowell is the cofounder of DIYbio, a worldwide network of "biohackers" dedicated to creating pop-up labs and doing biology outside the traditional environments of universities and industry. But when he ran into Perfetto at the 2010 Bay Area Maker Faire, the two men agreed that community labs just aren't as exciting as they sound. Not yet anyway. Looking at your blood under a microscope is the opposite of innovation—it's arts and crafts. "People would jump up and say, 'I want to do this. What do I do?' And no one had any good ideas. Or the ideas were too complicated to be translated into a starter project," Cowell says. Before the burgeoning world of garage labs could really take off, it needed to be easier for people to get their own home projects started. And the barrier to entry wasn't education or even space. It was a lack of affordable tools. CoFactor aims to supply them.

Science is all about coming up with smart ways to answer hard questions. But sometimes getting those answers requires expensive machines. Physicists looking to understand the universe don't just set up a pendulum anymore—today they build multibillion-dollar underground particle accelerators. PCR machines, critical to genetics-powered biology, start at around $6,000. And these machines, with their intricately tuned bits and pieces, aren't friendly to the kind of void-your-warranty hacking at the heart of the maker movement (not to mention creative experimental design). In short, no amateur is going to drop tens of thousands of dollars to get a lab running, and many scientists don't understand the inner workings of their expensive, grant-funded gadgetry well enough to whimsically crack the machines open and see how they can be modified. But thanks to the DIY revolution and Arduino, the open source circuit board, big thinkers like Cowell and engineers like Perfetto (whose OpenPCR device sells for just $599) are reverse engineering the big-budget tools. And then they're sharing their methods with the world.

Ask people inside the biohacker movement where they think it will have the biggest impact and they talk about education—being able to do genetics in classrooms. They (regularly) bring up Sushigate, the 2008 case of New York City high school students who used DNA testing to discover that sushi restaurants and supermarkets were mislabeling their fish. The results may be cool, but for now the machines are where the real action is. Behind the scenes, engineers and science enthusiasts are teaming up to mod tools and technologies and then sell their inventions—or simply share tips on how to build them—to anyone interested. Homemade PCR devices are drawing the most attention, since anyone who wants to work with DNA has to put it through a PCR machine first.

That's what has drawn a few hundred people to the online community surrounding Perfetto's OpenPCR project. Polymerase chain reaction is really just a process of heating and cooling genetic material. Weill Cornell Medical College researcher Russell Durrett, cofounder of New York City's community lab GenSpace, built one using a lightbulb, an Arduino board, an old computer fan, and some PVC pipe. Biotech advocate Rob Carlson also has a version, called the LavaAmp, that he says could be easily mass-manufactured just like any consumer product. "It doesn't have to be a big company," Carlson says. "The manufacturing is set up so that if anybody wanted to make 100,000, they could do that, and the quality of the resulting molecules would be just fine."

But PCR machines are only the beginning. Keegan Cooke, a former microbial fuel cell researcher, has been selling a home-built battery called a MudWatt kit. The MudWatt creates energy by capturing electrons released when mud-borne bacteria eat metal oxides. The kit comes with an anode, a cathode, and an LED light. Users fill the box with about two cups of muck—any sort has the right microbes, though stinkier stuff seems to work better—and some leftovers from the fridge (to feed the critters). The microbes generate electricity as they eat, and the electrodes capture it to power the light. This microbial fuel cell tech isn't good enough to be scaled up to wide use yet, but the open source model for distribution means that people can start making advances in their backyards. Cooke has already updated and modified his kit based on user feedback. "One sixth grader found that the mud in his nearby river generated almost double the power. He also recommended that we try a different material for our electrodes, and we found that it also produced double the power. It's nice, this process of people giving us feedback and evolving the technology," Cooke says.

Another example: Cathal Garvey's DremelFuge. The centrifuge—a device for rapidly spinning substances to separate lighter components from heavy ones—is essential in many fields of science, but a professional-grade version can cost thousands of dollars. Garvey, a biologist in Cork, Ireland, designed one that can be made by 3-D printers—either with an at-home printer called a MakerBot or by the 3-D print-on-demand company Shapeways (for $57). The DremelFuge is a small round disk with slots that hold standard microcentrifuge tubes. It's designed to fit snugly onto a rotary tool, which can spin the tubes at 33,000 rpm, producing up to 51,000 g's. (A standard professional centrifuge produces only about 24,000 g's.) Garvey gave his DremelFuge a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike license, meaning it can be used or remixed by anyone.

BUILD YOUR OWN LAB

Conventional laboratory equipment is powerful but expensive. The biohacking movement is remaking those tools on the cheap.—E.B.

DIY GEAR

 

PRO GEAR

OpenPCR

Maker: CoFactor 
Features: A polymerase chain reaction device. Replicates DNA by heating and cooling so it can be analyzed. Able to perform 16 reactions at once. Comes with temperature sensors, a control board, and control software.
Price: $599

StepOne System

Maker: Applied Biosystems 
Features: Able to run 48 reactions at a time. Touchscreen interface and real- time monitoring.
Price: $6,000-17,000

GeneLaser

Maker: CoFactor 
Features: All the chemicals you need to amplify DNA on a PCR device. Users then send the genetic material to a lab for analysis. 
Price: $99 for four reactions

DNA Test Kit

Maker: 23andMe 
Features: A test tube that you spit into (copiously) and send back to the company, which does all the processing and analysis. 
Price: $200-400

MudWatt Microbial Fuel Cell

Maker: KeegoTech
Features: Fill the plastic box with a handful of mud and food leftovers, and two graphite electrodes capture the electrons released by hungry bacteria. Instant battery! 
Price: $45

No laboratory equivalent

Custom microbial fuel-cell systems can cost several hundred thousand dollars to assemble.

SpikerBox

Maker: Backyard Brains
Features: Electrodes and a chip set let you listen to—and with an iPhone, visualize—the neurons firing in, say, a cockroach leg. 
Price: $90

Preamplifier

Maker: Stanford Research Systems
Features: Two inputs and similar noise measurement, but no audio output. Weighs 15 pounds. 
Price: $2,400

Perhaps the biggest tool-making success so far, however, comes from the world of neuroscience. It's a hand-sized box made of translucent neon-orange plastic with some electronics inside and a wire sticking out. For just $90, the device—called a SpikerBox—does something remarkable: It records and makes audible the sound of neurons firing. Connect two electrodes to the leg of a live cockroach (included); every time the bug twitches, its neurons emit an electrical spike that translates into a loud click. It sounds simple, but the ability to reveal a spike for such a small amount of money is a bit of a revolution in the study of neurobiology.

The SpikerBox grew out of the frustration of its inventors—engineers Tim Marzullo and Greg Gage—with the high cost of their lab equipment. As students at the University of Michigan's Neural Engineering Laboratory, they came to feel that their work wasn't having enough impact given the money being spent. "In that lab you do silly things like design electrodes that cost thousands and thousands of dollars," Gage says. "And then they would sit on a shelf afterward, because they were someone's PhD project."

Eventually, Marzullo says, they realized that "if the objective is to show spikes, you don't need a million dollars and a clean room." They started on what Gage calls a self-imposed engineering challenge: Make electrodes for $100. They told each other that if they pulled it off, it'd be "funny." Then they wrote an abstract and brought prototypes of their hack to the Society for Neuroscience conference in 2008. At their poster presentation, the prototype SpikerBox didn't work—yet it still caused a stir. "We were flooded with neuroscientists and educators who said they'd been waiting for this for years," Marzullo says. (Shortly thereafter they built a box that worked.)

In 2009, Marzullo and Gage started a company, Backyard Brains, to sell the box. They've shipped over 550 kits and demo'd the device for more than 6,000 people (including passengers on a Delta Air Lines flight, where they stuck a sign to the bathroom door reading free neuroscience lessons at seat 33a and b). Though they're keen to earn a living from their company, they're fine with the relatively small amount of money they're making now—as long as someone out there is learning about neuroscience. (A recent $250,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health also helps.) Which is why they're strong believers in keeping the device and its intellectual property open source. It can be purchased in various stages of assembly, and detailed instructions for building the SpikerBox are available for free download on their website, along with software for interpreting the intensity and duration of the spikes.

SpikerBoxes are even making their way into real science labs. W. David Stahlman, a professor of psychology at UCLA, recently purchased one to use in his research on hermit crab behavior. Traditionally, he says, psychologists don't focus on neuroscience. But while studying attention, learning, and distraction in the hermit crabs, he grew interested in how those behaviors are exhibited in the crabs' brains. A SpikerBox means that doing this kind of experimentation is no longer cost-prohibitive for a young professor. Even better, there's no warranty to void. "When you're working with equipment that's much more expensive, you're more hesitant to open it up and tinker with it," Stahlman says. And as a nifty bonus, he can capture the data right to an iPhone or iPad.

The companies that sell professional-grade PCR machines to laboratories are predictably unimpressed by all this fuss. Jeff Rosner, head of research and development for the PCR division at Life Technologies and a former engineer at Hewlett-Packard, says he's intrigued by the OpenPCR movement, but he hardly sees the gadgets it's producing as competition. "What they're doing is really sort of PCR 101," he says. "The thermal-cycling machine is only a small piece of what's important about PCR and what's required to do it. You need so many other things, including access to chemistry that's way harder to hack than the machinery itself." (Most chemical reagents are proprietary, and every manufacturer has a unique process for making the chemicals work. Perfetto and Cowell have been mixing and matching chemicals and protocols to simplify the process for their home kits.)

Still, it's difficult for Rosner to conceal his excitement over the fact that hackers are getting interested in his technology—and he admits that he actually has a machine shop in his own backyard. "There are some real barriers for them," Rosner says. "The reality is that costs have declined from hundreds of thousands of dollars to tens of thousands, but they have to get down lower before they'll be accessible to hackers." Then, after a pause, he adds, "I hope that happens."

But Perfetto and Cowell don't see any reason to wait. Cowell is churning with ideas for new projects. He organized two weekend prototype-building hackathons last spring called FutureLabCamp—and, of course, he also participated. "I want to build an LED spectrophotometer with an Arduino," Cowell says. "People have done it before, but I want to make it better. I want to build a tiny incubator for test tubes. They're easy to build, but they're all big. There are no tiny ones. Then there's a biology idea, a genetic idea—I can't remember now. Maybe it was building a transluminator gel box for electrophoresis." Sounds like that upstairs bedroom is about to get even more crowded.


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http://heybryan.org/
1 512 203 0507

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Thursday, August 18, 2011

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Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Unicorn Bags - Home

Unicorn Bags - Home

Do you need a clear autoclavable bag for mushroom cultivation and spawn production?

  • You want a bag that will not harden or have pin holes, coming out of an autoclave.
  • You want a bag that does not wrinkle or loose its shape when heated.
  • You want a bag that is designed for mushroom cultivation

Small Logo: Unicorn Bags

  • Stay soft and easy to seal after heat treatment in autoclave for six hours at 262°F(125°C).
  • Can be any size and length, with as many filters as you want, where you need them.
  • Can provide gas exchange, but exclude water vapor, so your spawn does not dehydrate.
  • Provide a perfect environment for fungi growth. Because we produce our own filters, gas transmission rates can be adjusted to suit your needs.
  • Can be used for fungi, nematode production for bio-control of insects.

UNICORN provides free development to create a microvented bag for your application. We give our clients the best service and products of consistent, excellent quality with an unmatched price.

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Paul Stamets on 6 ways mushrooms can save the world | Video on TED.com

Paul Stamets on 6 ways mushrooms can save the world | Video on TED.com
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Radical Mycology Convergence 2011 « Radical Mycology

Radical Mycology Convergence 2011 « Radical Mycology
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The DIY microscope incubator is complete! « Cheapass Science

The DIY microscope incubator is complete! « Cheapass Science
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MeshLab

MeshLab

MeshLab is an open source, portable, and extensible system for the processing and editing of unstructured 3D triangular meshes.
The system is aimed to help the processing of the typical not-so-small unstructured models arising in 3D scanning, providing a set of tools for editing, cleaning, healing, inspecting, rendering and converting this kind of meshes.
The system is heavily based on the VCG library developed at the Visual Computing Lab of ISTI - CNR, for all the core mesh processing tasks and it is available for Windows, MacOSX, and Linux. . The MeshLab system started in late 2005 as a part of the FGT course of the Computer Science department of University of Pisa and most of the code (~15k lines) of the first versions was written by a handful of willing students. The following years FGT students have continued to work to this project implementing more and more features. The proud MeshLab developers are listed here.
This project is actively supported by the 3D-CoForm project.
Other projects that have previously supported MeshLab are listed here.

Download Latest Version (16 February 2011) V1.3.0a (changes)

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Tuesday, August 16, 2011

The Urban Farming Guys - Miiu.org

The Urban Farming Guys - Miiu.org

Building a resilient community in a Kansas City ghetto.

Who are we?

We are the urban experiment.

We are the seed that died and went into the ground. We are about 20 families who have purposefully uprooted from out of our comfortable suburban homes and moved into one of the worst neighborhoods in Kansas City. We each bought homes within a 5 block radius of each other and we put down our stake for the sake of the youth and the poor. What is going to happen to us … who knows, but this is certainly not a novelty idea, and please don’t try it yourselves without thinking it through. We are a band of pioneers. We don’t claim this is even a good idea…. it is our lives. We are cultivating the life of the inner city. The Police helicopter is our favorite bird. Neighborhood meetings are our drama. Dropping crime stats are our touchdown cheer. Just to see people walking their dogs around the block again is a sign of good things to come. Stay tuned, lots of adventure to come….and please Join Us Here

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$80 Android Phone Sells Like Hotcakes in Kenya, the World Next? | Singularity Hub

$80 Android Phone Sells Like Hotcakes in Kenya, the World Next? | Singularity Hub
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Researchers Develop Micro-Electronic Device to Create Skin Tattoos

Researchers Develop Micro-Electronic Device to Create Skin Tattoos
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Two Cool Technologies Combined: Apple iPad Controls PI Mini Hexapod

Two Cool Technologies Combined: Apple iPad Controls PI Mini Hexapod
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New Tool May Yield Smaller, Faster Optoelectronics

New Tool May Yield Smaller, Faster Optoelectronics
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AeroQuad Forums - AeroQuad - The Open Source Quadcopter

AeroQuad Forums - AeroQuad - The Open Source Quadcopter
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Monday, August 15, 2011

MetalicaRap - RepRapWiki

MetalicaRap - RepRapWiki

An Electron Beam 3D Metal Powder Printer with Solar Cell Fab. ability, including microscope vision system (SEM) & Z axis metal correction in a vacuum.(Design stage).
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Additive Companies Run Production Parts

Additive Companies Run Production Parts

The EOSINT M 270 DMLS machine laser sinters powdered metal in 20 micron layers
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CNC Machine Shop | Custom Waterjet, Plasma, Laser Cutting | eMachineShop.com

CNC Machine Shop | Custom Waterjet, Plasma, Laser Cutting | eMachineShop.com
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Bino download - Bino 1.0.0 / 1.1.3

Bino download - Bino 1.0.0 / 1.1.3

Bino is a video player for stereoscopic 3D video. It supports subtitles and multi-display output.
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A First Look Inside Virgin Galactic’s Commercial Spaceship | Singularity Hub

A First Look Inside Virgin Galactic’s Commercial Spaceship | Singularity Hub
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First test of OpenQwaq with open source video codecs « teleXLR8

First test of OpenQwaq with open source video codecs « teleXLR8
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Ralph Merkle on the future of nanotechnology | KurzweilAI

Ralph Merkle on the future of nanotechnology | KurzweilAI
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One day of peace: Jeremy Gilley « K21st – Essential 21st Century Knowledge

One day of peace: Jeremy Gilley « K21st – Essential 21st Century Knowledge
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Arduino playground - PIDLibrary

Arduino playground - PIDLibrary
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An expanded genetic code with a functional quadruplet codon

An expanded genetic code with a functional quadruplet codon
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BBC News - Animal's genetic code redesigned

BBC News - Animal's genetic code redesigned
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Sunday, August 14, 2011

WikiHouse.CC

WikiHouse.CC

WikiHouse will be shared via a Creative Commons license for anyone to adapt and improve. A WikiHouse is fabricated from locally sourced plywood cut on a CNC mill from openly shared template files, and assembled with minimal skill by local people.

The first WikiHouse will be constructed in South Korea at the Gwangju Design Biennale 2011. We are now looking for architects, furniture designers, product designers, craftsmen, and makers from around the world who are interested in contributing to the WikiHouse process. If that's you then please drop us an line on hello@wikihouse.cc!
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Fwd: [WebBio] Designing Complementary and Mismatch siRNAs for Silencing a Gene



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: G P S Raghava <raghavagps@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, Aug 11, 2011 at 6:26 AM
Subject: [WebBio] Designing Complementary and Mismatch siRNAs for Silencing a Gene
To: "webbio: Web Servers for Biologists" <webbio@googlegroups.com>


We are please to announce a new server DESIRM from group which is
recently published in PLOS ONE
See http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0023443 or
http://www.imtech.res.in/raghava/desirm/ .

Raghava


Abstract of paper

In past, numerous methods have been developed for predicting efficacy
of short interfering RNA (siRNA). However these methods have been
developed for predicting efficacy of fully complementary siRNA against
a gene. Best of author's knowledge no method has been developed for
predicting efficacy of mismatch siRNA against a gene. In this study, a
systematic attempt has been made to identify highly effective
complementary as well as mismatch siRNAs for silencing a gene.

Support vector machine (SVM) based models have been developed for
predicting efficacy of siRNAs using composition, binary and hybrid
pattern siRNAs. We achieved maximum correlation 0.67 between predicted
and actual efficacy of siRNAs using hybrid model. All models were
trained and tested on a dataset of 2182 siRNAs and performance was
evaluated using five-fold cross validation techniques. The performance
of our method desiRm is comparable to other well-known methods. In
this study, first time attempt has been made to design mutant siRNAs
(mismatch siRNAs). In this approach we mutated a given siRNA on all
possible sites/positions with all possible nucleotides. Efficacy of
each mutated siRNA is predicted using our method desiRm. It is well
known from literature that mismatches between siRNA and target affects
the silencing efficacy. Thus we have incorporated the rules derived
from base mismatches experimental data to find out over all efficacy
of mutated or mismatch siRNAs. Finally we developed a webserver,
desiRm (http://www.imtech.res.in/raghava/desirm/) for designing highly
effective siRNA for silencing a gene. This tool will be helpful to
design siRNA to degrade disease isoform of heterozygous single
nucleotide polymorphism gene without depleting the wild type protein.



--
http://www.google.com/profiles/technologiclee

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Last chance to enrol in OU's Robotics course

Last chance to enrol in OU's Robotics course
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New technique scales up nanofiber production

New technique scales up nanofiber production
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Phone losing charge? Novel concept allows LCDs to recycle energy

Phone losing charge? Novel concept allows LCDs to recycle energy
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box2dweb - Box2DFlash port to javascript - Google Project Hosting

box2dweb - Box2DFlash port to javascript - Google Project Hosting
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Bacterial nanowires conduct like metals - physicsworld.com

Bacterial nanowires conduct like metals - physicsworld.com
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Building a Subversive Grassroots Network - IEEE Spectrum

Building a Subversive Grassroots Network - IEEE Spectrum
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Open Source Effort Will Deliver Low-Cost Wi-Fi for All | PCWorld Business Center

Open Source Effort Will Deliver Low-Cost Wi-Fi for All | PCWorld Business Center
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Saturday, August 13, 2011

OpenSimulator - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

OpenSimulator - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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$1 Plastic Chip Can Diagnose HIV in 15 Minutes | Gay Blog | Gay News

$1 Plastic Chip Can Diagnose HIV in 15 Minutes | Gay Blog | Gay News
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Nanofibers That Might Regenerate Blood VesselsMedgadget

Nanofibers That Might Regenerate Blood VesselsMedgadget
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Nanotechnology Now - Press Release: "The Molecular Workbench Wins SPORE Award: NSF-funded project wins award for being an outstanding online educational resource"

Nanotechnology Now - Press Release: "The Molecular Workbench Wins SPORE Award: NSF-funded project wins award for being an outstanding online educational resource"
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New X-ray microscopy technique images magnetic nanostructure

New X-ray microscopy technique images magnetic nanostructure
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Fwd: Update 24.08: First synthetic organ transplant made possible by nanotechnology



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Foresight Institute <noreply@foresight.org>
Date: Wed, Aug 3, 2011 at 3:08 PM
Subject: Update 24.08: First synthetic organ transplant made possible by nanotechnology
To: technologiclee@gmail.com


Foresight Institute logo
masthead image

First synthetic organ transplant made possible by nanotechnology

 

Foresight Update 24.08—August 4, 2011
ISSN 1078-9731

 

Discuss these news stories at http://foresight.org/nanodot.

In this issue:

Foreseeing Future Technologies - Join Foresight
Events
Contact Foresight

2011 Foresight Institute Prize in Communication deadline is Sept. 30, 2011

The nomination process for the 2011 Foresight Institute Prize in Communication is now open. The prizewinner for the Communication Award will be awarded a $1,000.00 prize plus a physical award. …

2011 Foresight Institute Feynman Prize deadline is September 30, 2011

The nomination process for the 2011 Foresight Institute Feynman Prize is now open. Two prizes in the amount of $5,000 each will be awarded to the researchers whose recent work has most advanced the achievement of Feynman's goal for nanotechnology: molecular manufacturing, defined as the construction of atomically-precise products through the use of molecular machine systems. Separate prizes will be awarded for theoretical work and for experimental work. The winners of this year's prizes will be announced at a venue to be announced. …

A four-artificial-neuron network from 112 DNA strands

Following up on their recent accomplishment of building a computational circuit from 74 small DNA molecules, Caltech researchers assembled 112 DNA strands into four artificial neurons that they trained with four pieces of information about four scientists. The artificial neural network can then play a game in which it properly answers questions about the identity of a scientist that the player has in mind even when the player gives it incomplete or wrong information. …

DNA nanotechnology provides detailed monitoring of single cells

A short segment of single-stranded DNA artificially evolved to bind to a particular protein growth factor has been adapted to make a molecular sensor for that factor. Upon binding the growth factor the DNA changes shape, bringing two fluorescent dye molecules closer together, thus producing an optical signal. After chemical attachment of the sensor to the membranes of an adult stem cell, and transplantation of the stem cell into a mouse where it homes to the bone marrow, the sensor reports on the environment of the cell. …

Foresight's recent past president honored by his undergraduate university

Foresight's recent past president J. Storrs "Josh" Hall was awarded the 2011 Achievement Award in the Sciences from his undergraduate alma mater Drew University …

Nanotechnology therapy for head and neck cancer shows promise

…Researchers at the University of Michigan have demonstrated in a model using immunocompromised mice (so that they do not reject human tumors) that dendrimers targeted to tumors and carrying anti-cancer drugs show great promise as potential therapy for head and neck cancer. …

American Chemical Society grant to study molecular gears

The American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund has awarded a grant to study the development of molecular gears for use in future molecular machines. …

Foresight on Internet radio

Foresight President Christine Peterson appeared along with former Foresight President J. Storrs Hall on Internet radio on July 13 …
Added to The World Transformed web site July 14: Christine Peterson on Transformations.
Added to The World Transformed web site July 18: J. Storrs Hall on Transformations.

First synthetic organ transplant made possible by nanotechnology

Nanotechnology has played a critical role in the first synthetic organ transplant, a trachea (windpipe). A patented nanocomposite of unreported composition was used to form a scaffold exactly the same size and shape as the patients own windpipe, which was then seeded with adult stem cells from the patient's own bone marrow. …

An evolution machine to accelerate nanotechnology development?

Proposals for assembling molecular machine systems from parts based on biopolymers usually take the approach of computationally designing proteins, RNA, or DNA molecules to serve as devices or as components of supramolecular systems. An alternative approach that has also been pursued is directed evolution in the laboratory …

Handling flexible parts in RNA nanotechnology

As a road to advanced nanotechnology, RNA nanotechnology offers greater structural and functional versatility than does DNA nanotechnology. A disadvantage of multiple structural motifs, however, is that finding small molecules that bind specifically to an RNA molecule is more difficult than, for example, finding small molecules that bind specifically to protein molecules, which exhibit single defined structures. …

—Nanodot posts by James Lewis

Foreseeing Future Technologies

Advancements in technologies such as nanotech, robotics, and biotech are promising to make major differences in our lives in the not-too-distant future, as the Industrial Revolution did to the agrarian world — to do for the physical world what the computer and Internet have done to the world of information.

Since 1986, the Foresight Institute has been in the forefront of a worldwide community of visionaries who work to help shape these possibilities into a positive, beneficial reality. If you would like to help us understand the potential of these technologies, and influence their direction, please consider becoming a member of the Foresight community. With your support, Foresight will continue to educate the general public on these technologies and what they will mean to our society.

To join:
http://foresight.org/members/index.html

Events

Upcoming Events

IEEE NANO 2011
August 15-18 2011
Portland, Oregon

NANO is the flagship IEEE conference in Nanotechnology, in which practitioners will see nanotechnologies at work in both their own and related fields, from basic research and theory to industrial applications.

Nano and Giga Challenges in Electronics, Photonics and Renewable Energy
Symposium and Summer School (Tutorial Lectures)
September 12-16 2011 Moscow - Zelenograd, Russia

The NGC2011 conference in Russia invites academic and industrial researchers to present tutorial, expository and original research papers dedicated to solving scientific and technological problems in electronics, photonics and renewable energy …

The Seventeenth International Conference on DNA Computing and Molecular Programming
September 19-23 2011
Caltech, Pasadena, California, USA

Research in DNA computing and molecular programming draws together mathematics, computer science, physics, chemistry, biology, and nanotechnology to address the analysis, design, and synthesis of information-based molecular systems. This annual meeting is the premier forum where scientists with diverse backgrounds come together with the common purpose of advancing the engineering and science of biology and chemistry from the point of view of computer science, physics, and mathematics.

Moving from Top Down to Bottom Up
September 22 2011 - 14:00 GMT, webinar

This IOP webinar will look at examples of bottom up approaches to engineering and manufacturing from different sectors including biosensing, electronics and regenerative medicine.

IPAS 2012
February 12-15 2012
Chamonix, France

The aim of the Sixth International Precision Assembly Seminar is to discuss the rapidly evolving field of micro-assembly, including the development of microfactories and microsystem fabrication.

Contact Foresight

Foresight Update is emailed every week to 10,000 individuals in more than 125 countries. Foresight Institute is a member-supported organization. We offer membership levels appropriate to meet the needs and interests of individuals and companies. To find out more about membership, follow this link:
http://foresight.org/members/index.html

To join:
https://www.foresight.org/d/donate

Past issues: http://www.foresight.org/publications/weekly.html
Earlier issues are here.

Foresight Institute
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