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Tuesday, December 28, 2010

Fwd: bionet.molbio.methds-reagnts - 2 new messages in 2 topics - digest

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "bionet.molbio.methds-reagnts group" <noreply@googlegroups.com>
Date: Dec 28, 2010 3:00 AM
Subject: bionet.molbio.methds-reagnts - 2 new messages in 2 topics - digest
To: "bionet.molbio.methds-reagnts digest subscribers" <bionet.molbio.methds-reagnts@googlegroups.com>


bionet.molbio.methds-reagnts
http://groups.google.com/group/bionet.molbio.methds-reagnts?hl=en

bionet.molbio.methds-reagnts@googlegroups.com

Today's topics:

* Methods Digest, Vol 67, Issue 8 - 1 messages, 1 author
 http://groups.google.com/group/bionet.molbio.methds-reagnts/t/ca739b039a1c5a1f?hl=en
* gel elution of 6KB PCR product - 1 messages, 1 author
 http://groups.google.com/group/bionet.molbio.methds-reagnts/t/fcdaf69d6c779d50?hl=en

==============================================================================
TOPIC: Methods Digest, Vol 67, Issue 8
http://groups.google.com/group/bionet.molbio.methds-reagnts/t/ca739b039a1c5a1f?hl=en
==============================================================================

== 1 of 1 ==
Date: Sun, Dec 26 2010 5:35 am
From: Virash Gupta


Dear B Ram,
try following following method. make a very small hole at the bottom
of a 0.5 ml PCR tube and cover it with some sterile glass wool. Put
your cut gel band in this tube and close it. Now put this tube into a
1.5 ml eppendorf tube. using an appropriate balancing tube spin at
12,000 rpm for 5 min. you should get 70-80% of your DNA in the
eppendorf tube which can be precipitated and resuspended in small
volume. Alternatively, put this tube into 1.5 ml tube containing ~100
microlitre TAE buffer. Also add same amount of this buffer in 0.5 ml
tube. Take two small pieces of platinum wires, dip one through space
between 0.5 ml and 1.5 ml tube so that it immerses in the buffer.
other piece of platinum wire should be purt in 0.5 ml tube buffer.
apply low current (~ 10V) with black electrode connected to wire in
0.5 ml tube and red electrode to other one immersed in 1.5 ml tube
buffer. This will make a small electrophoresis coloumn. after around
20 min, whole of DNA will move into buffer of 1.5 ml tube. Disacrd 0.5
ml tube along with its contents. precipitate DNA from buffer of 1.5 ml
tube using sod acetate and cold ethanol. All the best.

On 12/25/10, methods-request@oat.bio.indiana.edu
<methods-request@oat.bio.indiana.edu> wrote:
> Send Methods mailing list submissions to
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>
> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
>       http://www.bio.net/biomail/listinfo/methods
> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
>       methods-request@net.bio.net
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> You can reach the person managing the list at
>       methods-owner@net.bio.net
>
> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
> than "Re: Contents of Methods digest..."
>
>
> Today's Topics:
>
>    1. gel elution of 6KB PCR product (B.Rama chandran)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2010 18:52:35 +0530
> From: "B.Rama chandran" <chandranbrama@gmail.com>
> Subject: gel elution of 6KB PCR product
> To: Methods@magpie.bio.indiana.edu
> Message-ID:
>       <AANLkTikscKjcve5M+V_SpxhzymrfjbiQ39HRep0YQOCS@mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
>
> Dear All,
>
>        I am facing problem in the  gel elution of 6KB PCR product, I am
> getting very less yield (~10ng/micto liter). I am using  Sigma gel
> extraction kit (catalog no:NA1111). Since yield is very less I couldn't use
> that product for restriction digestion. If you have any suggestion please
> give me. If you know any other technique which will give better yield please
> let me know that.
>
> regards,
> B.Ram.
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> _______________________________________________
> Methods mailing list
> Methods@net.bio.net
> http://www.bio.net/biomail/listinfo/methods
>
> End of Methods Digest, Vol 67, Issue 8
> **************************************
>


--
Dr V K Gupta
Sr Microbiologist (Mol Biology)
IMBL, Department of Entomology
Pun. Agric. Univ., Ludhiana (Pb)-141004- India
M: 081465-55515






==============================================================================
TOPIC: gel elution of 6KB PCR product
http://groups.google.com/group/bionet.molbio.methds-reagnts/t/fcdaf69d6c779d50?hl=en
==============================================================================

== 1 of 1 ==
Date: Mon, Dec 27 2010 2:12 am
From: Fathi Hassan


hello,

you can try to clone the PCR product you got from gel in any cloning vector like

pJet or pGem, since they require low amounts of PCR products, then you can
digest the vector and get the fragment ready for further cloning. it is two
steps more but may help you
good luck
FH



________________________________
From: DK <dk@no.email.thankstospam.net>
To: methods@magpie.bio.indiana.edu
Sent: Sun, December 26, 2010 12:28:15 AM
Subject: Re: gel elution of 6KB PCR product

In article <mailman.445.1293295295.15153.methods@net.bio.net>, "B.Rama chandran"

<chandranbrama@gmail.com> wrote:
>Dear All,
>
>       I am facing problem in the  gel elution of 6KB PCR product, I am
>getting very less yield (~10ng/micto liter). I am using  Sigma gel
>extraction kit (catalog no:NA1111). Since yield is very less I couldn't use
>that product for restriction digestion. If you have any suggestion please
>give me. If you know any other technique which will give better yield please
>let me know that.

What is the yield as % of input? If you didn't have much to begin
with, nothing can help. ~50% on gel-extraction are ~ normal. If it is the
yield that is poor, try the same protocol with 2 kbp. If the result is good,
your kit is not appropriate for 6K. If the result is bad, either your
reagents are gone bad/improperly prepared or you are doing something
wrong. I've purified 14 kbp from gel with about 30% using Qiagen's
kit. Never a problem.

DK
_______________________________________________
Methods mailing list
Methods@net.bio.net
http://www.bio.net/biomail/listinfo/methods




--0-1362310605-1293367365=:9174
Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii

<html><head><style type="text/css"><!-- DIV {margin:0px;}
--></style></head><body><div
style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:12pt">you can try to
clone the PCR product you got from gel in any cloning vector like pJet or pGem,
since they requier low amounts of PCR products, then you can digest the vector
and get the fragment ready for further cloning. it is two steps more but may
help you<br>good luck<br>FH<br><br><div style="font-family:
arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: 12pt;"><div style="font-family:
arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: 12pt;"><font face="Tahoma" size="2"><hr
size="1"><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">From:</span></b> DK
<dk@no.email.thankstospam.net><br><b><span style="font-weight:
bold;">To:</span></b> methods@magpie.bio.indiana.edu<br><b><span
style="font-weight: bold;">Sent:</span></b> Sun, December 26, 2010 12:28:15
AM<br><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Subject:</span></b> Re: gel elution of
6KB PCR product<br></font><br>
In article <<a
ymailto="mailto:mailman.445.1293295295.15153.methods@net.bio.net"
href="mailto:mailman.445.1293295295.15153.methods@net.bio.net">mailman.445.1293295295.15153.methods@net.bio.net</a>>,
 "B.Rama chandran" <<a ymailto="mailto:chandranbrama@gmail.com"
href="mailto:chandranbrama@gmail.com">chandranbrama@gmail.com</a>>
wrote:<br>>Dear All,<br>><br>>       I am facing problem
in the  gel elution of 6KB PCR product, I am<br>>getting very less yield
(~10ng/micto liter). I am using  Sigma gel<br>>extraction kit (catalog
no:NA1111). Since yield is very less I couldn't use<br>>that product for
restriction digestion. If you have any suggestion please<br>>give me. If you
know any other technique which will give better yield please<br>>let me know
that.<br><br>What is the yield as % of input? If you didn't have much to begin
<br>with, nothing can help. ~50% on gel-extraction are ~ normal. If it
is the <br>yield that is poor, try the same protocol with 2 kbp. If the result
is good, <br>your kit is not appropriate for 6K. If the result is bad, either
your <br>reagents are gone bad/improperly prepared or you are doing something
<br>wrong. I've purified 14 kbp from gel with about 30% using Qiagen's <br>kit.
Never a problem.
<br><br>DK<br>_______________________________________________<br>Methods mailing
list<br><a ymailto="mailto:Methods@net.bio.net"
href="mailto:Methods@net.bio.net">Methods@net.bio.net</a><br><span><a
target="_blank"
href="http://www.bio.net/biomail/listinfo/methods">http://www.bio.net/biomail/listinfo/methods</a></span><br></div></div>

</div><br>

     </body></html>
--0-1362310605-1293367365=:9174--








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Fwd: The 10 insights of the decade, 10 breakthroughs of 2010 (K21st - Essential 21st Century Knowledge)

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From: "Newsfeed to Email Gateway" <emlynoregan@gmail.com>
Date: Dec 17, 2010 11:46 AM
Subject: The 10 insights of the decade, 10 breakthroughs of 2010 (K21st - Essential 21st Century Knowledge)
To: <technologiclee@gmail.com>

The 10 insights of the decade, 10 breakthroughs of 2010 (12/17/10 14:50:45 UTC)

From quantum mechanics, unveiling and sequencing the Neandertal genome, to Exoplanets and metamaterials, what more could we ask for?

Amplify'd from www.kurzweilai.net

"This year's Breakthrough of the Year represents the first time that scientists have demonstrated quantum effects in the motion of a human-made object," said Adrian Cho, a news writer for Science. "On a conceptual level that's cool because it extends quantum mechanics into a whole new realm. On a practical level, it opens up a variety of possibilities ranging from new experiments that meld quantum control over light, electrical currents and motion to, perhaps someday, tests of the bounds of quantum mechanics and our sense of reality."

Science's list of the nine other groundbreaking achievements from 2010 follows.

Synthetic Biology: In a defining moment for biology and biotechnology, researchers built a synthetic genome and used it to transform the identity of a bacterium. The genome replaced the bacterium's DNA so that it produced a new set of proteins—an achievement that prompted a Congressional hearing on synthetic biology. In the future, researchers envision synthetic genomes that are custom-built to generate biofuels, pharmaceuticals or other useful chemicals.

Neandertal Genome: Researchers sequenced the Neandertal genome from the bones of three female Neandertals who lived in Croatia sometime between 38,000 and 44,000 years ago. New methods of sequencing degraded fragments of DNA allowed scientists to make the first direct comparisons between the modern human genome and that of our Neandertal ancestors.

HIV Prophylaxis: Two HIV prevention trials of different, novel strategies reported unequivocal success: A vaginal gel that contains the anti-HIV drug tenofovir reduced HIV infections in women by 39 percent and an oral pre-exposure prophylaxis led to 43.8 fewer HIV infections in a group of men and transgender women who have sex with men.

Exome Sequencing/Rare Disease Genes: By sequencing just the exons of a genome, or the tiny portion that actually codes for proteins, researchers who study rare inherited diseases caused by a single, flawed gene were able to identify specific mutations underlying at least a dozen diseases.

Molecular Dynamics Simulations:Simulating the gyrations that proteins make as they fold has been a combinatorial nightmare. Now, researchers have harnessed the power of one of the world's most powerful computers to track the motions of atoms in a small, folding protein for a length of time 100 times longer than any previous efforts.

Quantum Simulator: To describe what they see in the lab, physicists cook up theories based on equations. Those equations can be fiendishly hard to solve. This year, though, researchers found a short-cut by making quantum simulators—artificial crystals in which spots of laser light play the role of ions and atoms trapped in the light stand in for electrons. The devices provide quick answers to theoretical problems in condensed matter physics and they might eventually help solve mysteries such as superconductivity.

Next-Generation Genomics: Faster and cheaper sequencing technologies are enabling very large-scale studies of both ancient and modern DNA. The 1,000 Genomes Project, for example, has already identified much of the genome variation that makes us uniquely human—and other projects in the works are set to reveal much more of the genome's function.

RNA Reprogramming:Reprogramming cells—turning back their developmental clocks to make them behave like unspecialized "stem cells" in an embryo—has become a standard lab technique for studying diseases and development. This year, researchers found a way to do it using synthetic RNA. Compared with previous methods, the new technique is twice as fast, 100 times as efficient and potentially safer for therapeutic use.

The Return of the Rat: Mice rule the world of laboratory animals, but for many purposes researchers would rather use rats. Rats are easier to work with and anatomically more similar to human beings; their big drawback is that methods used to make "knockout mice"—animals tailored for research by having specific genes precisely disabled—don't work for rats. A flurry of research this year, however, promises to bring "knockout rats" to labs in a big way.

Finally, to celebrate the end of the current decade, Science news reporters and editors have taken a step back from their weekly reporting to take a broader look at 10 of the scientific insights that have changed the face of science since the dawn of the new millennium. A list of these 10 "Insights of the Decade" follows.

The Dark Genome: Genes used to get all the glory. Now, however, researchers recognize that these protein-coding regions of the genome account for just 1.5 percent of the whole. The rest of the genome, including small coding and non-coding RNAs—previously written off as "junk"—is proving to be just as important as the genes.

Precision Cosmology: Over the past decade, researchers have deduced a very precise recipe for the content of the universe, which consists of ordinary matter, dark matter and dark energy; as well as instructions for putting it all together. These advances have transformed cosmology into a precision science with a standard theory that now leaves very little wiggle room for other ideas.

Ancient Biomolecules: The realization that "biomolecules" like ancient DNA and collagen can survive for tens of thousands of years and provide important information about long-dead plants, animals and humans has provided a boon for paleontology. Analysis of these tiny time machines can now reveal anatomical adaptations that skeletal evidence simply can't provide, such as the color of a dinosaur's feathers or how woolly mammoths withstood the cold.

Water on Mars: Half a dozen missions to Mars over the past decade have provided clear evidence that the Red Planet once harbored enough water—either on it or just inside it—to alter rock formations and, possibly, sustain life. This Martian water was probably present around the time that life was beginning to appear on Earth, but there is still enough moisture on Mars today to encourage scientists seeking living, breathing microbes.

Reprogramming Cells: During the past decade, the notion that development is a one-way street has been turned on its head. Now, researchers have figured out how to "reprogram" fully developed cells into so-called pluripotent cells that regain their potential to become any type of cell in the body. This technique has already been used to make cell lines from patients with rare diseases, but ultimately, scientists hope to grow genetically matched replacement cells, tissues and organs.

The Microbiome: A major shift in the way we view the microbes and viruses that call the human body home has led researchers to the concept of the microbiome—or the collective genomes of the host and the other creatures that live on or inside it. Since 90 percent of the cells in our bodies are actually microbial, scientists are beginning to understand how significantly microbial genes can affect how much energy we absorb from our foods and how our immune systems respond to infections.

Exoplanets: In the year 2000, researchers were aware of just 26 planets outside our solar system. By 2010, that number had jumped to 502—and still counting. With emerging technologies, astronomers expect to find abundant Earth-like planets in the universe. But for now, the sizes and orbits of larger planets already discovered are revolutionizing scientists' understanding of how planetary systems form and evolve.

Inflammation: Not long ago, inflammation was known as the simple sidekick to our healing machinery, briefly setting in to help immune cells rebuild tissue damage caused by trauma or infection. Today, however, researchers believe that inflammation is also a driving force behind the chronic diseases that will eventually kill nearly all of us, including cancer, Alzheimer's disease, atherosclerosis, diabetes and obesity.

Metamaterials: By synthesizing materials with unconventional and tunable optical properties, physicists and engineers have pioneered new ways to guide and manipulate light, creating lenses that defy the fundamental limits on resolution. They've even begun constructing "cloaks" that can make an object invisible.

Climate Change: Over the past decade, researchers have solidified some fundamental facts surrounding global climate change: The world is warming, humans are behind the warming and the natural processes of the Earth are not likely to slow that warming. But, the next 10 years will determine how scientists and policymakers proceed with this vital information.

Read more at www.kurzweilai.net

 


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Agent procedural programming language

Agena download - Agena 1.0.5
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Sunday, December 12, 2010

Thursday, December 9, 2010

Wednesday, December 8, 2010

dog tracker gps

dog tracker gps - Google Search
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dog tracker

dog tracker gps - Google Search
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Monday, December 6, 2010

processing.js graphics without plugins

Processing.js
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Jumo social dogooding

Home | Jumo
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android 2.3 changes

Android 2.3 Platform | Android Developers

"

The platform now includes a SIP protocol stack and framework API that lets developers build internet telephony applications. Using the API, applications can offer voice calling features without having to manage sessions, transport-level communication, or audio — these are handled transparently by the platform's SIP API and services.

Android 2.3 includes an NFC stack and framework API that lets developers read NDEF tags that are discovered as a user touches an NFC-enabled device to tag elements embedded in stickers, smart posters, and even other devices.

Android 2.3 adds platform and API support for several new sensor reading types — gyroscope, rotation vector, linear acceleration, gravity, and barometer.

Applications can now make use of any cameras that are available on a device, for either photo or video capture. The Camera lets applications query for the number of cameras available and the unique characteristics of each.

New parameters for cameras, including focus distance, focus mode, and preview fps maximum/minimum

The platform's media framework adds support for new per-track or global audio effects, including bass boost, headphone virtualization, equalization, and reverb.

The application uses advanced multipoint multitouch capabilities on the device screen, for tracking up to five points fully independently.


 

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disapora (open source facebook)

DIASPORA*

 

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identi.ca (open source twitter)

Public timeline - Identi.ca

 

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WiFi scanner graph

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8' standalone='yes' ?><wifiScanResults generator="com.farproc.wifi.analyzer (2.5.3)" generatorUrl="market://search?q=pname:com.farproc.wifi.analyzer" number="1"><scanResult SSID="RR_BECK" BSSID="00:24:8c:79:71:a5" capabilities="[WEP]" frequency="2462" level="-74" /></wifiScanResults>

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Fwd: Rev



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Lee Nelson <technologiclee@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, Jun 14, 2010 at 1:02 PM
Subject: Rev
To: Lee Nelson <technologiclee@gmail.com>


Title:ct cs


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Sunday, December 5, 2010

gene therapy - bleedind disorder cure

Gene Therapy Corrected Rare Bleeding Disorder: Study - Yahoo! News

 

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lightfoil

Optical Wing Generates Lift from Light: Scientific American

 

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python editor

The editor that boosts your python development in Launchpad

 

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keep track of firefox addons

Add-on Collector :: Add-ons for Firefox

 

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bash and vim customization

My Bash and Vim setups | Swaroop C H - India, Technology, Life Skills

 

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toxicology data network

HSDB Search

 

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Octave high level language for numerical computation

Octave

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SciLab free numerical computation

Home - Scilab WebSite

 

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linux kernal map

Interactive map of Linux kernel

 

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error correction SSDs

Micron embeds error correction in flash memory chips, calls it ClearNAND -- Engadget

 

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google docs in windows menu

Add Google Docs to the Windows "New" Document Context Menu

 

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noncontact Atomic Force Microscope

Imaging Pentacene | Phasing

 

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bacteria turn gears

Bacterial Micro Machines Turn Tiny Gears | Wired Science | Wired.com

 

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nanoLAMPS

Futurity.org – Biomedicine at the flip of a switch

 

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artificial ovary grown

Futurity.org – Artificial ovary grown using 3-D Petri dish

 

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apps that work with dropbox

Dropbox - Apps - Online backup, file sync and sharing made easy.

 

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plaque enzyme

Tooth decay to be a thing of the past? Enzyme responsible for dental plaque sticking to teeth deciphered

 

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ssh bookmarks

How to create SSH ‘bookmarks’ | Viktor Petersson.com

 

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Nanoengineers wiki

Welcome to your new Wikidot site - Nanoengineers

 

Would you like to contribute to the Nanoengineers wiki?

 

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Saturday, December 4, 2010

universal subtitles

Universal Subtitles - Free and open tools for creating captions, subtitles, and translations for video.

 

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reprap market / jobs

RepRap Forums :: RepRap Marketplace and Job Shop

 

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open data

Panton Principles

 

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nanofactory

Molecular Manufacturing - The Future of Nanotechnology - TheNanoAge.com

 

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garden in a truck

It's a Truck! It's a Farm! (And Now, It's Going To Be a Movie.) - Planet Green

 

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nanophotonic chips

IBM Unveils Nanophotonic Chips that Could Lead the Exascale Computing Revolution | Popular Science

 

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carbonyl Iron for diamond synthesis

Artificial diamond synthesis - Sintez RusMIM

 

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hot electrons - solar power

Capturing "Hot" Electrons to Double Solar Power - Technology Review

 

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smallest chess set

World’s smallest chess set and single hair barber win big in micro object contest

 

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Homebrew science: Jello-based lab-on-a-chip

Link: http://arstechnica.com/science/news/2010/06/home-brew-science-jello-based-lab-on-a-chip.ars (via shareaholic.com)

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DNA alignment game

Phylo

 

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sharaholic

Shareaholic has been successfully installed.

 

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Fwd: Google Alert - "xray laser"



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Google Alerts <googlealerts-noreply@google.com>
Date: Sat, Dec 4, 2010 at 6:12 AM
Subject: Google Alert - "xray laser"
To: technologiclee@gmail.com


Web2 new results for "xray laser"
 
GainSaturated Photoionization Based Atomic InnerShell XRay Laser ...
GainSaturated Photoionization Based Atomic InnerShell XRay Laser in. Neon at 850 eV. N. Rohringer1, D. Ryan2, M. Purvis2, J. Dunn1, F. Albert1, ...
www.pqeconference.com/pqe2011/abstractd/220p.pdf



Tip: Use site restrict in your query to search within a site (site:nytimes.com or site:.edu). Learn more.

Remove this alert.
Create another alert.
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Thursday, December 2, 2010

Single Molecule Motor

An electric motor made from a single molecule

 

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Optical Tweezers blog

Blog on Optical Tweezers: All-Optical Optomechanics: An Optical Spring Mirror

 

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nter for a Stateless Society

Center for a Stateless Society

 

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Cinnamon replaces toxic chemicals in nanoparticle production

Cinnamon replaces toxic chemicals in nanoparticle production - Innovations - Ecoseed Information Network

 

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Python Package Index

Python Package Index : PyPI

 

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Fwd: comp.lang.python - Wing IDE


From: Wingware


Hi,

Wingware has released version 3.2.12 of Wing IDE, an integrated development
environment designed specifically for the Python programming language.

This release includes the following improvements:

* Support for Stackless version 2.7
* Correctly ignore exceptions in debugger for logged exceptions
* Fix indent conversion when file had inconsistent eol characters
* Change Mako block commenting to use ##
* Fix testing tool result display when re-running similarly named tests
* 8 other minor bug fixes

See http://wingware.com/pub/wingide/3.2.12/CHANGELOG.txt for details.

*Downloads*

Wing IDE Professional    http://wingware.com/downloads/wingide/3.2

Wing IDE Personal        http://wingware.com/downloads/wingide-personal/3.2

Wing IDE 101             http://wingware.com/downloads/wingide-101/3.2

*About Wing IDE*

Wing IDE is an integrated development environment designed specifically for
the Python programming language.  It provides powerful editing, testing, and
debugging features that help reduce development and debugging time, cut down
on coding errors, and make it easier to understand and navigate Python code.
Wing IDE can be used to develop Python code for web, GUI, and embedded
scripting applications.

Wing IDE is available in three product levels:  Wing IDE Professional is
the full-featured Python IDE, Wing IDE Personal offers a reduced feature
set at a low price, and Wing IDE 101 is a free simplified version designed
for teaching entry level programming courses with Python.

Version 3.2 of Wing IDE Professional includes the following major features:

* Professional quality code editor with vi, emacs, and other keyboard
personalities
* Code intelligence for Python:  Auto-completion, call tips,
goto-definition,
  error indicators, smart indent and re-wrapping, and source navigation
* Advanced multi-threaded debugger with graphical UI, command line
interaction,
  conditional breakpoints, data value tool tips over code, watch tool, and
  externally launched and remote debugging
* Powerful search and replace options including keyboard driven and
graphical
  UIs, multi-file, wild card, and regular expression search and replace
* Version control integration for Subversion, CVS, Bazaar, git,
Mercurial, and
  Perforce
* Integrated unit testing for the unittest, nose, and doctest frameworks
* Many other features including project manager, bookmarks, code snippets,
  OS command integration, indentation manager, PyLint integration, and
perspectives
* Extremely configurable and may be extended with Python scripts

Please refer to the feature list at http://wingware.com/wingide/features for
a detailed listing of features by product level.

System requirements are Windows 2000 or later, OS X 10.3.9 or later for
PPC or
Intel (requires X11 Server), or a recent Linux system (either 32 or 64 bit).
Wing IDE supports Python versions 2.0.x through 3.1.x and Stackless Python.

For more information, see http://wingware.com/products

*Purchasing and Upgrading*

Wing 3.2 is a free upgrade for all Wing IDE 3.0 and 3.1 users. Version 2.x
licenses cost 1/2 the normal price to upgrade.

Upgrade a license:     https://wingware.com/store/upgrade

Purchase a license:    https://wingware.com/store/purchase

--

Wingware | Python IDE

The Intelligent Development Environment
for Python Programmers

www.wingware.com





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index : nanoengineer

nanoengineer - open-source nanotech CAD

 

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C++ Serialization

Insane Coding: C++ Serialization Anyone?

 

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Wednesday, December 1, 2010

Free e-books on nanotechnology

Free e-books on nanotechnology
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