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Thursday, March 31, 2011

Sunday, March 27, 2011

Jacob Barnett,12, with higher IQ than Einstein develops his own theory of relativity | Mail Online

Jacob Barnett,12, with higher IQ than Einstein develops his own theory of relativity | Mail Online
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return $foo; » Blog Archive » To fork or not to fork

return $foo; » Blog Archive » To fork or not to fork
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icogno.com - Joan - Our Artificially Intelligent, speaking, videocentric Avatar

icogno.com - Joan - Our Artificially Intelligent, speaking, videocentric Avatar
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Understanding proteins

Understanding proteins
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Solar Knowledge: India's First Floating Solar Plant

Solar Knowledge: India's First Floating Solar Plant
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It's a Bird! It's a Plane! It's ... a New Seagull-Like Robot Spy Drone! | Fast Company

It's a Bird! It's a Plane! It's ... a New Seagull-Like Robot Spy Drone! | Fast Company
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Rapid probing of single molecules with a nanomechanical interface

Rapid probing of single molecules with a nanomechanical interface
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Universal property of music discovered

Universal property of music discovered
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NEBcutter V2.0

NEBcutter V2.0
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This tool allows you to find the unique Restriction Enzymes (REases) in several lists of REases.

http://uniquerestrictionsites.appspot.com/
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How I Know I Don’t Know Enough About Lisp Macros :: nklein software

How I Know I Don’t Know Enough About Lisp Macros :: nklein software
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How It Works: The Light-Driven Computer | Popular Science

How It Works: The Light-Driven Computer | Popular Science
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Monday, March 21, 2011

Sound makes nanowires blink

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Fwd: Open-Source Spectrometer



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: General Oya <generaloya@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, Feb 15, 2011 at 4:04 PM
Subject: Re: Open-Source Spectrometer
To: diybio@googlegroups.com


Here's some links to a few opensource meditations on this issue.

http://www.instructables.com/id/A-simple-DIY-spectrophotometer/

http://www.creative-technology.net/MAKE.html

http://openwetware.org/wiki/Citizen_Science/Open_Spectrophotometer_Project/Application

http://blog.makezine.com/archive/2008/11/safety-spectrometer.html

Intrigued to see what we'll come up with. I'm all about compactness in the form of lab mobility and deployment.

Ryan


On Tue, Feb 15, 2011 at 4:06 AM, Cathal Garvey <cathalgarvey@gmail.com> wrote:

I am struck by the possibility of making a 3Dprinted or lasercut LED/Cuvette/CD holding case with a manual slider to move one part to select which band of light passes through the cuvette. With a photoresistor along the lightpath and at right angles to the cuvette, that'd give you a fair bit of spectro function, right?

The most expensive part, as always it seems, is the light source..

On 15 Feb 2011 08:01, "Nathan McCorkle" <nmz787@gmail.com> wrote:

The CDs just act like a grating, to spread the light out by
diffraction (diffraction grating)


On Tue, Feb 15, 2011 at 1:06 AM, General Oya <generaloya@gmail.com> wrote:
> I understand UV/Vis LE...

--
Nathan McCorkle
Rochester Institute of Technology
College of Science, Biotechnology/Bioinformati...

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Make: Liquid ID Spectrometer

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Process discovered that regulates DNA replication and repair

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Brain-computer interface allows paralyzed patients to play music

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Nerve-Electronic Hybrid Could Meld Mind and Machine

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Saturday, March 19, 2011

Memory may be built with standard building blocks - life - 17 March 2011 - New Scientist

Memory may be built with standard building blocks - life - 17 March 2011 - New Scientist
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Poor Minnesotans to be Barred from Carrying Cash | MyFDL

Poor Minnesotans to be Barred from Carrying Cash | MyFDL
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Impossible world: Articles: M.C. Escher: More Mathematics Than Meets the Eye

Impossible world: Articles: M.C. Escher: More Mathematics Than Meets the Eye
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Android Beginners: NDK Setup Step by Step « Mind The Robot

Android Beginners: NDK Setup Step by Step « Mind The Robot
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Kawasaki has 450 Kilowatt superconducting motor and development project for 3 megawatt superconducting motors

Kawasaki has 450 Kilowatt superconducting motor and development project for 3 megawatt superconducting motors
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Unorthodox links to the internet: Signalling dissent | The Economist

Unorthodox links to the internet: Signalling dissent | The Economist
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Lessons From Chernobyl for Japan - NYTimes.com

Lessons From Chernobyl for Japan - NYTimes.com
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Japan Status

Japan Status
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Math websites for girls and young women

websites for girls and young women
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3D Print with Sand, Pee and Bacteria - Fabbaloo Blog - Fabbaloo

3D Print with Sand, Pee and Bacteria - Fabbaloo Blog - Fabbaloo
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Open Source Micro-Factory | Factor E Farm Blog

Open Source Micro-Factory | Factor E Farm Blog
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Scariest Toy Concept Ever: The Epidermits Thing | Gadget Lab | Wired.com

Scariest Toy Concept Ever: The Epidermits Thing | Gadget Lab | Wired.com
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Exposure to Environmental Microorganisms and Childhood Asthma — NEJM

Exposure to Environmental Microorganisms and Childhood Asthma — NEJM
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Wednesday, March 16, 2011

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft - Female sex hormone controls human sperm

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft - Female sex hormone controls human sperm
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New microscope captures 3D movies of living cells

New microscope captures 3D movies of living cells
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EvoMouse turns your digits digital

EvoMouse turns your digits digital
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In Virginia, Delivering Broadband To the Customers Big Telecom Forgot - Slashdot

In Virginia, Delivering Broadband To the Customers Big Telecom Forgot - Slashdot
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Wireshark · Go deep.

Wireshark · Go deep.
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Chip-Scale Atomic Clock - IEEE Spectrum

Chip-Scale Atomic Clock - IEEE Spectrum
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World’s First Instant Universal Eyeglasses To Help Children in the Developing World | The Intersection | Discover Magazine

World’s First Instant Universal Eyeglasses To Help Children in the Developing World | The Intersection | Discover Magazine
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3D printing method advances electrically small antenna design, Nanoparticles, University of Illinois - NanoTechWire.com - The online resource for Nano Technology And Research

3D printing method advances electrically small antenna design, Nanoparticles, University of Illinois - NanoTechWire.com - The online resource for Nano Technology And Research
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Cell Phone Spectrometer

Cell Phone Spectrometer
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Etched Quantum Dots Emit Single Photons (photonics.com | Mar 2011 | Research & Technology)

Etched Quantum Dots Emit Single Photons (photonics.com | Mar 2011 | Research & Technology)
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Laser-Driven Electrons Observed in Real Time (photonics.com | Mar 2011 | Research & Technology)

Laser-Driven Electrons Observed in Real Time (photonics.com | Mar 2011 | Research & Technology)
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Linear Technology - Design Simulation and Device Models

Linear Technology - Design Simulation and Device Models
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TED: Ideas worth spreading

TED: Ideas worth spreading
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“gaaaa” slowly turn into “water” – The birth of a word: Deb Roy « K21st – Essential 21st Century Knowledge

“gaaaa” slowly turn into “water” – The birth of a word: Deb Roy « K21st – Essential 21st Century Knowledge
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Free online teleprompter.

Free online teleprompter.
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NVU

NVU
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Java SE Downloads - Netbeans + JDK Bundle

Java SE Downloads - Netbeans + JDK Bundle
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Code::Blocks

Code::Blocks
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Searching for Network Laws in Slime | Wired Science | Wired.com

Searching for Network Laws in Slime | Wired Science | Wired.com
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Researchers use light to move molecules

Researchers use light to move molecules
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Pre NeuroCyberProsthetics

Pre NeuroCyberProsthetics
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Fwd: [Open Manufacturing] New Open Source Ecology custom search engine and widget



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: elifarley <elifarley@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, Mar 16, 2011 at 8:01 AM
Subject: [Open Manufacturing] New Open Source Ecology custom search engine and widget
To: Open Manufacturing <openmanufacturing@googlegroups.com>


The OSE custom search engine is now available at:

 http://openfarmtech.org/wiki/OSE_custom_search_engine

It allows you to search the OSE wiki (http://openfarmtech.org/wiki/),
discussion forum (http://openfarmtech.org/forum/), blog
(openfarmtech.org/weblog/), and also includes an option to search
related sites, like P2P Foundation, the Open Manufacturing group, the
RepRap wiki and forum, The Household Cyclopedia, open hardware and
permaculture sites, and more.

And you can also add the OSE search widget to your web page or
iGoogle.

Please let me know if you have any suggestions regarding this (like
other related sites we should include in search results).

To learn more about Open Source Ecology, see http://opensourceecology.org/

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Boost solar cell efficiency with organic material at nanoscale

Boost solar cell efficiency with organic material at nanoscale | Far To Nice
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graphing cloak bacteria

All wrapped up: Researcher's graphene cloak protects bacteria
Published with Blogger-droid v1.6.7
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phillip torrone - first female engineer on the cover of WIRED

phillip torrone - first female engineer on the cover of WIRED
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Ocean acidification

Ocean acidification

New version of seacarb (2.4)
Published 16 March 2011 Science Leave a Comment

seacarb is an R package that calculates parameters of the seawater carbonate system and includes functions useful for ocean acidification research. Version 2.4 has just been released. It provides three new functions and associated data sets. We are grateful to Andreas Andersson and Steeve Comeau who provided some of the code. Note that it may take a few days before the update is available for all operating systems and CRAN servers.
Continue reading ‘New version of seacarb (2.4)’

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Ocean acidification: The acid sea (photo gallery)
Published 16 March 2011 Media coverage 2 Comments

The carbon dioxide we pump into the air is seeping into the oceans and slowly acidifying them. One hundred years from now, will oysters, mussels, and coral reefs survive?

Castello Aragonese is a tiny island that rises straight out of the Tyrrhenian Sea like a tower. Seventeen miles west of Naples, it can be reached from the somewhat larger island of Ischia via a long, narrow stone bridge. The tourists who visit Castello Aragonese come to see what life was like in the past. They climb—or better yet, take the elevator—up to a massive castle, which houses a display of medieval torture instruments. The scientists who visit the island, by contrast, come to see what life will be like in the future.

Owing to a quirk of geology, the sea around Castello Aragonese provides a window onto the oceans of 2050 and beyond. Bubbles of CO2 rise from volcanic vents on the seafloor and dissolve to form carbonic acid. Carbonic acid is relatively weak; people drink it all the time in carbonated beverages. But if enough of it forms, it makes seawater corrosive. “When you get to the extremely high CO2, almost nothing can tolerate that,” Jason Hall-Spencer, a marine biologist from Britain’s University of Plymouth, explains. Castello Aragonese offers a natural analogue for an unnatural process: The acidification that has taken place off its shore is occurring more gradually across the world’s oceans, as they absorb more and more of the carbon dioxide that’s coming from tailpipes and smokestacks.
Continue reading ‘Ocean acidification: The acid sea (photo gallery)’

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Scientists probe Antarctic waters over acidification (video)
Published 16 March 2011 Media coverage Leave a Comment


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Opening for two post-doc positions in the CRE laboratory (closing 1-Apr-2011)
Published 16 March 2011 Jobs Leave a Comment

The CRE laboratory has openings for two Post-Doctoral Research Fellows. The first position will involve working on a Smart State funded project that explores the risks of rapidly warming and acidifying oceans to coral health. This exploration will be done within the large-scale mesocosms established at Heron Island Research Station. The second position will involve research to understand the impacts of climate change and ocean acidification on non-coral invertebrates, macroalgae and topological complexity.
Continue reading ‘Opening for two post-doc positions in the CRE laboratory (closing 1-Apr-2011)’

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Investigation grant within the project “Responses of phytoplankton communities from the Subtropical North Atlantic Gyre to increasing CO2 concentrations and consequent carbonate chemistry changes in the ocean ‐ Azores (ROPICO2)”
Published 15 March 2011 Jobs Leave a Comment

Grant: Investigation grant
Scientific area: Environment and Global change

Summary: Open call for one investigation grant within the project “Responses of phytoplankton communities from the Subtropical North Atlantic Gyre to increasing CO2 concentrations and consequent carbonate chemistry changes in the ocean ‐ Azores (ROPICO2)” at the University of the Azores (Terceira). The scholarship includes field and laboratory work.

Job description: One investigation grant is open for a student with a master in Biology, or similar area, to work within a Project entitled “Responses of phytoplankton communities from the Subtropical North Atlantic Gyre to increasing CO2 concentrations and consequent carbonate chemistry changes in the ocean ‐ Azores (ROPICO2)”)” (PTDC/ACCCLI/112735/2009), financed by the Science and Technology Foundation of Portugal (FCT).
Continue reading ‘Investigation grant within the project “Responses of phytoplankton communities from the Subtropical North Atlantic Gyre to increasing CO2 concentrations and consequent carbonate chemistry changes in the ocean ‐ Azores (ROPICO2)”’

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Marine ecosystems’ responses to climatic and anthropogenic forcings in the Mediterranean by ’The MERMEX Group’
Published 15 March 2011 Science Leave a Comment
Tags: review

The semi-enclosed nature of the Mediterranean Sea, together with its smaller inertia due to the relative short residence time of its water masses, make it highly reactive to external forcings, in particular variations of water, energy and matter fluxes at the interfaces. This region, which has been identified as a “hotspot” for climate change, is therefore expected to experience environmental impacts that are considerably greater than those in many other places around the world. These natural pressures interact with the increasing demographic and economic developments occurring heterogeneously in the coastal zone, making the Mediterranean even more sensitive. This review paper aims to provide a review of the state of current functioning and responses of Mediterranean marine biogeochemical cycles and ecosystems with respect to key natural and anthropogenic drivers and to consider the ecosystems’ responses to likely changes in physical, chemical and socio-economical forcings induced by global change and by growing anthropogenic pressure at the regional scale. The current knowledge on and expected changes due to single forcing (hydrodynamics, solar radiation, temperature and acidification, chemical contaminants) and combined forcing (nutrient sources and stoichiometry, extreme events) affecting the biogeochemical fluxes and ecosystem functioning are explored. Expected changes in biodiversity resulting from the combined action of the different forcings are proposed. Finally, modeling capabilities and necessity for modeling are presented. Modeling acts as an integrative tool to investigate the question of how climate change and anthropogenic activities impact the cycle of biogenic elements and marine ecosystems. A synthesis of our current knowledge of expected changes is proposed, highlighting relevant questions for the future of the Mediterranean ecosystems that are current research priorities for the scientific community. Finally, we discuss how these priorities can be approached by national and international multi-disciplinary research, which should be implemented on several levels, including observational studies and modeling at different temporal and spatial scales.
Continue reading ‘Marine ecosystems’ responses to climatic and anthropogenic forcings in the Mediterranean by ’The MERMEX Group’’

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MEECE Summer School 2011: Marine ecosystem evolution in a changing environment
Published 14 March 2011 Meetings Leave a Comment

Marine ecosystems are changing in response to both climate drivers (acidification, light, circulation and temperature) and anthropogenic drivers (fishing, pollution, invasive species and eutrophication). It is essential that we develop the knowledge necessary to learn how to live with, and adapt to these changes. Predictive modelling provides a tool to allow us to explore the possible consequences of such changes.

The aim of this course is to expose graduate students and young scientists to recent developments and methodologies in the simulation of marine ecosystems and their response to a changing environment.
Continue reading ‘MEECE Summer School 2011: Marine ecosystem evolution in a changing environment’

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Acidification and more: Newly recognized threats to marine life emerge as Earth warms
Published 14 March 2011 Media coverage Leave a Comment

When climate change leaped into global consciousness more than 20 years ago, the focus—as one might expect—was on the atmosphere. There was no doubt that sea levels would rise, with the expansion of warming oceans accompanied by a growing cascade of melt water from ice sheets and glaciers. But the main worry among policymakers and the public was how those rising seas would affect civilization, not on how the oceans themselves might be transformed.

Today, a growing body of evidence points to a web of changes already under way in ocean temperature, circulation, and biogeochemistry. These changes pose an array of risks to marine life that’s prompted a surge of research.

The best-known of the climate-related threats to ocean chemistry is acidification. The world’s oceans have soaked up roughly half a trillion tons of carbon dioxide, or about a third of all greenhouse gases produced by human activity since the Industrial Revolution. Because all that dissolved CO2 is weakly acidic, it’s been changing the pH balance of the oceans. On the logarithmic pH scale, the oceans—though still slightly alkaline—have moved toward acidity by about 0.1 point (roughly 30%).

Continue reading ‘Acidification and more: Newly recognized threats to marine life emerge as Earth warms’

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World Ocean Database 2001. Volume 6, Temporal distribution of pH, alkalinity, pCO2 and tCO2 profiles
Published 14 March 2011 Science Leave a Comment
Tags: chemistry

The oceanographic databases described by this atlas series greatly expands on the World Ocean Database 1998 (WOD98) product. We have expanded these earlier databases to include data from new instrument types such as profiling floats and new variables such as pCO2 and TCO2. Previous oceanographic databases including the NODC/WDC profile archives, and products derived from these databases, have proven to be of great utility to the international oceanographic, climate research, and operational environmental forecasting communities. In particular, the objectively analyzed fields of temperature and salinity derived from these databases have been used in a variety of ways. These include use as boundary and/or initial conditions in numerical ocean circulation models, for verification of numerical simulations of the ocean, as a form of “sea truth” for satellite measurements such as altimetric observations of sea surface height, and for planning oceanographic expeditions. Increasingly nutrient fields are being used to initialize and/or verify biogeochemical models of the world ocean. The databases, and products based on these databases, are critical for support of international assessment programs such as the Intergovernmental Program on Climate Change (IPCC) of the United Nations.
Continue reading ‘World Ocean Database 2001. Volume 6, Temporal distribution of pH, alkalinity, pCO2 and tCO2 profiles’

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Impacts of climate change in a global hotspot for temperate marine biodiversity and ocean warming
Published 14 March 2011 Science Leave a Comment
Tags: review

Temperate Australia is a global hotspot for marine biodiversity and its waters have experienced well-above global average rates of ocean warming. We review the observed impacts of climate change (e.g. warming, ocean acidification, changes in storm patterns) on subtidal temperate coasts in Australia and assess how these systems are likely to respond to further change. Observed impacts are region specific with the greatest number of species responses attributable to climate change reported in south-eastern Australia, where recent ocean warming has been most pronounced. Here, a decline of giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) and poleward range extension of a key herbivore (sea urchin) and other trophically important reef organisms has occurred. Although, evidence of changes on other coastlines around Australia is limited, we suggest that this is due to a lack of data rather than lack of change. Because of the east–west orientation of the south coast, most of Australia’s temperate waters are found within a narrow latitudinal band, where any southward movement of isotherms is likely to affect species across very large areas. Future increases in temperature are likely to result in further range shifts of macroalgae and associated species, with range contractions and local extinctions to be expected for species that have their northern limits along the southern coastline. While there is currently no evidence of changes attributable to non-temperature related climate impacts, potentially due to a lack of long-term observational data, experimental evidence suggests that ocean acidification will result in negative effects on calcifying algae and animals. More importantly, recent experiments suggest the combined effects of climate change and non-climate stressors (overharvesting, reduced water quality) will lower the resilience of temperate marine communities to perturbations (e.g. storms, diseases, and introduced species), many of which are also predicted to increase in frequency and/or severity. Thus climate change is likely to, both by itself and in synergy with other stressors, impose change to southern Australian coastal species, including important habitat-forming algae and the associated ecological functioning of temperate coasts. Management of local and regional-scale stresses may increase the resistance of temperate marine communities to climate stressors and as such, provides an attractive tool for building resilience in temperate systems.
Continue reading ‘Impacts of climate change in a global hotspot for temperate marine biodiversity and ocean warming’

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arkfab

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DIY Spectro II « Topologic Oceans

DIY Spectro II « Topologic Oceans
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Fwd: Diagnostic and prognostic biomarker database



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Sciclips <kar.sanchayita@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, Mar 16, 2011 at 12:27 AM
Subject: Diagnostic and prognostic biomarker database
To: DIYbio <diybio@googlegroups.com>


We have launched a unique biomarker database that contains more than
29,000 unique biomarkers (for more than 1800 human diseases), which
are manually extracted from US patent/WO (PCT) publications and PubMed
abstracts.  This database contains biomarkers of diverse nature such
as:
1) Drug efficacy/response biomarkers (7708 unique biomarkers)
2) Disease risk assessment and predictive biomarkers (10,375 unique
biomarkers)
3) Protein/peptide/antibody biomarkers (7279 unique biomarkers)
4) Molecular diagnostic biomarkers, including gene/gene expression
biomarkers, polymporphisms/SNP biomarkers (including linkage
disequilibrium biomarkers) (7206 unique biomarkers)
5) Metabolomic biomarkers (811 unique biomarkers)
6) MicroRNA (miRNA) biomarkers (935 unique biomarkers)
7) Epigenetic biomarkers (700 unique biomarkers)

 Please follow this link to access our database:
http://www.sciclips.com/sciclips/diagnostic-biomarker-prognostic-biomarker-db.do

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Pocket Laser Engraver « adafruit industries blog

Pocket Laser Engraver « adafruit industries blog
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reprap-franklin - A RepRap Emulator - Google Project Hosting

reprap-franklin - A RepRap Emulator - Google Project Hosting



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Joseph Lewis <joehms22@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, Mar 15, 2011 at 4:58 PM
Subject: [reprap-dev] Emulator
To: RepRap-dev <reprap-dev@lists.reprap.org>


Hello everyone,

I just got finished with a RepRap emulator, it looks similar to some of the other GCode emulators out there except it can have different toolheads (not entirely implemented), different firmwares, and different sources of input (currently GCode files and UNIX sockets are supported). The UNIX sockets can be set up through VirtualBox so you can run a VM with RepRap printing software inside and see the printed part on the host machine.

The entire project is in Python and is GPL2, and uses the bundled TK library (so should be fairly cross platform, I've tested it on Windows and Linux).

I would love any feedback or contributions, especially in firmware as that is a little sparse so far.

Download/Screenshot: http://code.google.com/p/reprap-franklin/

Thanks,
Joe

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Public Key: [0xF8462E1593141C16]

It is no good to try to stop knowledge from going forward. Ignorance is never better than knowledge.
- Enrico Fermi


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self assembling molecular piston

Researchers develop first molecular piston capable of self-assembly - Image 1 of 2
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Friday, March 11, 2011

Fwd: Tsunami disasters and the cost of making things (Metamodern)



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Newsfeed to Email Gateway <emlynoregan@gmail.com>
Date: Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 5:44 PM
Subject: Tsunami disasters and the cost of making things (Metamodern)
To: technologiclee@gmail.com


Tsunami disasters and the cost of making things (03/11/11 22:22:17 UTC)

When I wake up to news of a coast smashed by a tsunami, I see yet another sign of our relative material poverty, a sign that our civilization hasn't yet mastered the art of making things.

Japan, by modern standards, is rich, yet costs deterred the construction of deployable barriers able to resist fast-rising sea*. If our civilization had mastered and applied the art of making things (including large, strong, inexpensive, reliable things) the impact of shift in the crust and a surge of the sea could have been slight.

Physics says we can do much better, dropping the cost of making high-performance products close to the cost of supplying simple raw materials, dropping the cost of structures, computers, photovoltaics (and more) by orders of magnitude.

The economics of high-throughput APM will change the economics of disaster preparedness.


Video of surging water and tumbling buildings here.


* To be more concrete, here's an outline of one design for a barrier structure:

Barrier length: The length of the coastline to be protected from a tsunami surge.

Configuration (pre-deployment): A trench in the seabed offshore, a few meters deep and wide, located in water a few tens of meters deep.

Main anchoring structure: Cables stretching a few hundred meters further from shore, then deeply anchored into the seabed.

Configuration (deployed): A buoyant tension structure, restrained by the cables, that (when released) rises with the water level on the seaward side.

I leave the constraints on membrane curvature, tension, and cable geometry, together with float volumes and cable strength, as an exercise for the design-oriented reader; some water flowing over the top is acceptable.

A radical reduction in the cost of manufacturing structures — and of the equipment needed to put them in place — would make an engineering project of this sort practical.

See also: storm surges, New Orleans.




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http://www.google.com/profiles/technologiclee

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Improved DNA Electrophoresis in Conditions Favoring Polyborates and Lewis Acid Complexation

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How Humans Got Spineless Penises and Big Brains

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Record Breaker: 'Very Cold' Brown Dwarf Discovered

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youll-shoot-your-eye-out-with-a-1mw-laser-pulse-pistol/

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http://www.bulletproofexecutive.com/new-video-dave-aspreys-the-upgraded-self-top

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Tuesday, March 8, 2011

Monday, March 7, 2011

Dabbleboard_logo The whiteboard reinvented Visualize, explore, collaborate

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You could be taking color pictures in the dark by the end of the year

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Molecular mechanism contributing to neuronal circuit formation found

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Bicycle material is ‘grown’ from high strength nylon powder

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Surgeon Anthony Atala demonstrates an early-stage experiment that could someday solve the organ-donor problem: a 3D printer that uses living cells to output a transplantable kidney.

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Maya Hair

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Microfluidic, label-free, high-throughput nanoparticle analyzer

Microfluidic, label-free, high-throughput nanoparticle analyzer
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7-Zip Portable App

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7-Zip

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Fwd: NanoEngineer-1 Portable for Windows XP/Vista/7



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Alexander230 <fire_2005@mail.ru>
Date: Mon, Mar 7, 2011 at 5:02 AM
Subject: NanoEngineer-1 Portable for Windows XP/Vista/7
To: nanoengineer-dev <nanoengineer-dev@googlegroups.com>


http://dl.dropbox.com/u/3839542/NanoEngineer-1.7z - current working
version of NanoEngineer-1 packed as portable application.

"NanoEngineer-1.exe" is a launcher which runs the program from source.
It's possible to modify the source in any text editor and launch .exe
to see changes immediately.

This is working build with old libraries. Python, Qt, PyQt, Berkeley
DB, other libraries and some debug/development tools are packed inside
virtual filesystem ("NanoEngineer-1 Development Suite.dat").
NanoEngineer-1 source is not packed, it's in "src" subfolder. This
build has been made with VMware ThinApp 4.6.



--
http://www.google.com/profiles/technologiclee

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vaio s

Sony VAIO S arrives stateside, brings along an advanced extended battery -- Engadget
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Remote controlled cockroach

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Saturday, March 5, 2011

ssh tricks

http://bit.ly/fujgeK
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Optical Tweezers

http://www.cobolt.se/opticaltweezers.html

Optical tweezers (originally called "single-beam gradient force trap") are a bioanalytical instrument that makes use of a highly-focused laser beam to provide an attractive or repulsive force, depending on the refractive index mismatch to physically hold and move microscopic dielectric objects. Optical tweezers have become a well known and successful tool in studying a variety of biological systems.

The narrowest point of the focused beam, known as the beam waist, contains a very strong electric field gradient. It turns out that dielectric particles are attracted along the gradient to the region of strongest electric field, which is the center of the beam. The laser light also tends to apply a force on particles in the beam along the direction of beam propagation. By utilising this force it is possible to manipulate biological cells and even move them from one position to another.

A basic optical tweezer setup includes:

a laser, a beam expander, some optics used to steer the beam location in the sample plane, a microscope objective
and condenser to create t
he trap in the sample plane, a position detector (e.g. quadrant photodiode) to measure beam displacements and a microscope illumination source coupled to a CCD camera (see Fig.1 on the right).

Extremely important properties of a laser used for optical tweezers are excellent beam quality and very low noise.


Read more about Cobolt Rumba ™ 1064 nm for optical tweezers. 


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http://light.sci-toys.com/

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CompuBioTicDB, a database of biological components for synthetic biology

Molecular elements for synthetic biology catalog | Home
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